Ayla Rose pursues singing career

IMG_4629By: Chloe Jackson

Seventeen -year- old Ayla Rose, a junior at Arlington High School, is tackling her musical goals professionally. Ayla records her music, typically categorized in the blues genre, at various studios, combining her vocals and skills on guitar.

  Her ambition and talent has been recognized by the magazine Pop Matters, which features an article on up and coming soloist  “Ayla Rose”.

   This past year, two of her singles were released, including “Give Me One Reason”, available on Spotify and Apple Music.

At a young age, Ayla found herself musically inclined, partially due to the musical aspirations of her father, who is also adept in the music field. Although she does not participate in school related activities pertaining to singing, such as drama, chorus, and other groups, Ayla continues to devote her time to pursuing her music.

   Singing as a career is not Ayla’s end goal, but “as a hobby” she will continue to work on it. A preferred genre of Ayla’s is R & B, although she plays and sings a variety of music.

       At the moment, Ayla is a soloist, releasing her own music within the past few months. However, she has been in a band and is open to the possibility of forming one again.  

Ayla enjoys “doing what [she] loves and hopes other people will enjoy it”. She inspires other teenage artists with her individual success at such a young age.

 

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Manion Sells Slime

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By: Jessie Cali

Videos of people playing with “slime,” a Silly Putty-esque toy, have taken over the internet. Inspired by the videos, Arlington High School sophomore Isabel Manion has started making and selling her own slime to AHS students.

Manion was shocked by the high prices of slime on the internet, so she began looking into how she could make it herself. “It wasn’t something that people at school were really making, so I decided I would give it a shot,” said Manion.

Manion started off by posting on her Instagram to gauge interest for the products, and her followers were excited about the idea. Manion began selling her slime through Instagram, but she says that “now people will approach me in school with slime requests”.

She has started experimenting with adding glitter, foam balls, and other goodies to her slime.

Manion’s homemade slime typically sells for about $3.

Students Rebuild New Orleans

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Abandoned lot in the Lower 9th Ward. [Courtesy of Henry Walters]
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Slavery memorial (and Katrina). [Courtesy of Henry Walters]
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Abandoned hospital (it would cost the city more to take it down, so they leave it)               [Courtesy of Henry Walters]

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Courtesy of Lulu Eddy
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Courtesy of Lulu Eddy
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Courtesy of Lulu Eddy

By: Claire Kitzmiller

In 2005, devastation surrounded hundreds of people in New Orleans, Louisiana, when hurricane Katrina struck. After twelve years, the city has not been fully rebuilt.

During this past April vacation, a group of students from the Follen Unitarian Church in Lexington went to New Orleans to perform a variety of services. The students rebuilt houses, gardened, mulched, and  participated in dialogues about racism.

They worked with service groups, NOLA Tree Project and Edible School Yard.

Several of the student who went on the trip are from Arlington High. Sophomores, Isabella Scopetski, Lulu Eddy, and Henry Walters are part of FUUY, Follen Unitarian Universalist Youth.

 Outside groups have done the majority of the rebuilding of New Orleans, because of the government’s insufficient funding.

The trip is important to Scopetski because she “learned a lot to take back to Arlington to better the community”.

Walters enjoys the work because he knows he is making a difference and helping people. Walters said, “You take a lot from it by giving.”

The theme of the trip was “Intent versus Impact”. Students learned the importance of asking what is needed instead of assuming.

Even though the people in New Orleans have experienced so much devastation, Lulu Eddy says, “It fills me with happiness to see how friendly and happy everyone living there is.”

The New Orleans community is grateful and welcoming to all those who offer their services and help.

Students De-Stress at Spring Fling

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courtesy of Karen Dillon
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courtesy of Karen Dillon

By: Lauren Murphy

On Saturday, May 13th, Student Council partnered with Arlington Youth Health and Safety Coalition to organize the first ever “Spring Fling”, an event for AHS students to relax and de-stress.

The event, held behind the Robbins Library, was free. It had many activities including yoga, painting, sidewalk chalk, and performances from live acoustic musicians. There were also free burritos donated by La Victoria and Anna’s Taqueria.

The main goal of this event was to build community for AHS students. Isa Dray, a sophomore, helped organize the event. It was important to her because Student Council was trying to create more “give back” events, “events [where we’re] not asking anything from the students. We just want them to come and have a good time,” Dray says.

Katherine Barker, a senior, chaired the event with Dray. For her, the goal of this event was “to be more inclusive and find ways to celebrate the diverse interests of the student body”.

Freshman Ella Simring attended the event and enjoyed it immensely. Her favorite activities were the sidewalk chalk and the “enlightening” bubbles. Simring felt very comfortable at this event. She said, “There was a nice, chill vibe around in general, and you didn’t have to put on any sort of façade or pretend to be someone else there; it felt very safe and welcoming”.

With the support of Karen Dillon from Arlington Youth Health and Safety Coalition, as well as AHS Social Workers Magali Olander and Chelsea White, the event ran smoothly. Barker is interested in continuing this event in the years to come.
Simring and her friends are looking forward to coming back and would “even be willing to help out with setting up”.

Teachers Form Band

By: Chloe Jackson

The teacher band at Arlington High School, The Educated Guests, known for playing at Battle of the Bands, is composed of Mr. Fant, Mr. Bourassa, Mr. McKnight, Ms. Bessette, and Mr. Marten.

Formed officially around 2014, The Educated Guests recruited musically inclined teachers willing to commit extra time to play in the band. They have performed at Battle of the Bands, the AHS Talent Show, the Unitarian Universalist Church, and the Knights of Columbus.

With Mr. Fant, Mr. Bourassa and Mr. McKnight on guitar, Mr. Marten playing drums, and Ms. Bessette singing, the band works diligently to apply their musical talents in addition to focusing on teaching. Mr. Marten, member of the band, describes The Educated Guests as “an equal opportunity group of noisemakers” who are open to the possibility of adding new members to their group.

The Educated Guests play a wide variety of musical genres and favorites among the band members have been Taylor Swift songs and pieces from the musical Hamilton.

Sophomore Isabella Scopeski admires the band because of their ability to “inspire students to go after what they want” and “the bond that has formed” between these Arlington colleagues. These talented five teachers are an example for prospective musically talented students.

Arlington High School alumni reunite after 60 years

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Nancy Price
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Arlington High Alumni
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Arlington High Alumni

By: Isabella Scopetski

The Arlington High School classes of 1951, 1954, 1960, and 1967 recently had a reunion in the Villages in Florida of about 40-50 Arlington High alumni. The reunion was organized by Ms. Nancy Price, who was a proud member of the class of 1954 at Arlington High School. “I thought I was going to be the oldest,” she said.

Price grew up in Arlington and went to the Junior High West for middle school and the Locke School for primary education. She lived on Paul Revere Road and Newland Road during her childhood and took the trolley to the Arlington High School because there was no other public transportation.

During Price’s high school years, Raymond Morrill was principal. Teachers included: Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Dow, Mr. Charles Downs, Mrs. Forsyth, George Fusco, Mrs. Kelly, Mr. Kroll, Mrs. Manning, Mrs. Mathews, Mr. Petratrala, Ann Willard, Mr. Toner, and Mary Thompson. Price said she had “Frank Kotchin [for drivers ed]… and the yearbook was dedicated to Doc McCarthy [the track coach]”.

Many people who live in Arlington have lived here for generations.  Nancy Price said, “My mother and aunt graduated from Arlington High in 1930 and 1932.” After Price was born in the Walnut Street hospital, which she believes was just a house, her family built their life in Arlington Massachusetts. Price said, “My father owned a taxi cab business in Arlington Center by the drug store, and my Mother worked at the Regent Theater.”

During her junior year at AHS, Price was a “drum majorette” in the school marching band. She was the female leader of the band who lead the group with her twirling baton.

Price recalled, “Polio was bad in the 1950s and one of our friends came down with Polio.” She described him as an “iron lung”. Price could only visit her ill family friend if she “wore a long gown and didn’t stay too long”. The family friend recovered for a short time until the Polio returned, causing the friend to take his life.

Like many high schoolers, Price endured the troubles of her teenage years, while proudly attending and thriving at her high school. Price encourages the students at Arlington High School today to “enjoy your school; it is one of the best”. She adds, “Have fun, work hard, and go to college!”
“We cheer today the red and gray. We know our boys will shine,” says Price, recalling what once was the Arlington High school cheer.

Art shows talent

By: Lulu Eddy

From April 3-14, sculptures, paintings, and mobiles were displayed in the teachers cafeteria. These works were from Ms. Rebola, Ms. McCullough, Mr. Moore’s classes. Each student from Art I, Art II, Mixed Media, Painting, Portfolio Prep, Digital Photography I and II all have at least one work present in the show that was chosen by their teacher.

 

Safe Zone stickers disappear

By: Claire Kitzmiller  

 

In early April, several teachers came into school and immediately noticed their safe zone stickers were gone. It appeared that someone had come in the nights before and scraped the stickers off of the walls and doors.

Most stickers were taken from outside of classrooms, but some were from the inside. The teachers’ main concern was not the damage to their property; it was the hateful statement that was being made.

Drama teacher, Michael Byrne, was very concerned because he believes, “It’s a simple but really clear statement that almost every teacher has made that their classroom is a safe zone.” He knows it is an important validation for students who are unsure.

The incident also worries Byrne because “it’s a statement to students and faculty that it’s not as safe as maybe we thought it was.” The school responded immediately and gave all teachers new stickers.

The GSA also held a discussion with the freshman class about the issue and safety through the school.

In an email sent to the AHS community, Dr Janger stated, “The administration realizes that the secret removal of safe zone stickers has caused many within the AHS community to be upset and concerned for their own and others safety and well-being.  This matter is being taken very seriously and that a thorough investigation by the  administration, the town and the Arlington Police Department is well under way.”

This has been a concerning time for many students and staff at AHS, but the administration is doing everything it can to make AHS a more inclusive and accepting school.