Boys Varsity Soccer Scored More Than Just A New Record

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By: Lulu Eddy & Eliza McKissick

The Arlington High varsity boys soccer team had a successful season. They were number one in the Middlesex league, and made it to state semi finals until they were knocked out by Concord Carlisle on November 13th at Manning Field in Lynn, MA. The boys battled until the end, only falling to the last penalty kick, in a shoot out 5-4. This is the farthest the boys soccer team has ever gone into tournament, and was their first time winning the Middlesex league title.

Going into the season, the boys did not expect such success and victory. Many of the players had not experienced the varsity level before. However, the “strong chemistry” between the boys brings them all together and prevents cliques, mentioned a few of the athletes when questioned about the integrity of their team dynamic.

The boys attribute the team’s success to their coach, Lance Yadzio. He did a great job “listening to the players and bringing the input from the captain’s into games” said Cleary. Yadzio brings up any concerns with the whole team, keeping the players unified, which helps with the overall team dynamic.

When bench players hop on the field, they all give 110% of their effort and energy. Cleary points out that “their spot is on the line”, so they must give it all they’ve got to prove themselves to their captains and coach, as the three captains additionally help their coach with the starting lineup.

While sophomore Perry Sofis-Scheft is off the field, he takes his time to scan the game so he can bring what the team is lacking when he gets put in the game. He picks up where the starters left off.

Over the summer, many of the upcoming underclassmen attended captains practices, allowing them to gain a lot of skill and ball control. Senior captains Max McKersie, Lloyd Cleary, and Adrien Black kept these gatherings focused. Manager Jeff Pacheco observes that  “players such as Noah Aarons and Lucas Plotkin have earned their time by proving their dedication on and off the field”.

Cleary notes that “by being number one in the state, the team has come into some games too cocky” costing them a win. “You must take things one step at a time”, advises Pacheco. “Be there for the grind” Perry says. “Never give up” Pacheco adds.

 

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Diverse Businesses and Organizations Meet Musical Talent on Town Day

 

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Junior Julian Carpenter Conducting AHS Jazz Band ~Courtesy of Olivia Carpenter

 

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Lulu Eddy (right) and Hamish Swanson (left) supporting AHS Girls Volleyball ~Courtesy of Isabella Scopetski

 

By: Michael Graham-Green

Saturday, September 16 was Town Day, an event that signals the end of summer and brings the many families of Arlington to the town center. With more than 200 businesses, organizations, churches, and schools from Arlington and surrounding towns, each represented by stalls along Mass Ave, this occasion, (the 41st annual Town Day), offered members of the community a chance to support familiar Arlington institutions while discovering new ones that pique their interest.

Set on a stage at the steps of Town Hall, the performances by local musicians are, for many, the main event of the day. Arlington High’s own Jazz Band and Madrigal Singers gave a stunning performance, playing pieces from a variety of genres. The two groups teamed up for performances of “Sweet Home Chicago” by Robert Johnson and “Crazy in Love” by Beyonceˊ. As part of the Jazz Band’s performance, the ensemble played “Cave Canem”, a piece composed and conducted by AHS junior Julian Carpenter, percussionist for band. When asked about the creative process that went into composing his piece and the work the band did to be performance-ready so soon after the start of the school year, Carpenter noted “jazz is about improvisation, but more importantly, listening to each other”. In the mere two weeks before the performance, Julian was impressed by how the they had “grown tighter as a band than [they] even were at last year’s town day”. He added,”I am very excited for this upcoming year with my peers.”

Venice Mountain-Zona, also a junior at AHS, offered her perspective on the performances as a member of the Madrigal Singers. “There’s something very special about performing at Town Day,” she said, “because it is an audience of our biggest supporters. Everyone’s so energetic and having such a good time and it just makes the experience that much more unforgettable.”

With participants from the Arlington PD to the Arlington-Belmont Crew to the restaurant Bistro Duet, and stunning musical talent, the 41st Town Day was a resounding success. It will be another year of evolution for a bustling town before the 42nd Town Day rolls around.

 

Spanish Students Exchange Lives With American Students

 

 

By: Miles Shapiro

Recently Arlington High school participated in the Spanish exchange, a program where students from Barcelona, Spain attend school in Arlington, Massachusetts for two weeks. During this time, Spanish students live with an Arlington High School student and their family. The exchange students attend classes along with the child from their surrogate family. Participants of the exchange all know some level of English, however, adeptness ranges from limited, to extensive understanding. Even within the brief amount of time this program lasts, American students report to have developed deep connection and friendship with their exchange students resulting from near constant proximity.

When asked about the societal disparity between the U.S. and Spain, student hosts report that Spain has a considerably more welcoming culture than may be expected. “[The exchange students] are much more accepting to people of different sexualities, different races, and political ideas” reports one AHS student. The ample contrast between Spanish and American daily life also serves as a vessel for students to gain a level of cultural awareness that they would not traditionally have access to.

The trip was equally a physical and social exchange as students explored each others differentiating opinions and ideas. As Spanish students admitted they were surprised by the vast amounts of homework given to American students, Arlington High goers, in turn, were astonished to learn of the the megar homework load their exchange students recieved by comparison.

Visiting Spanish students also seemed to display an adoration of U.S. public transportation, particularly in respect to how much faster and more efficient it is than in Spain.

Participating in any of the diverse assortment of exchange programs is a rewarding experience that allows students to make international connections while providing them with a taste of the world outside their own limiting social bubble.

Students De-Stress at Spring Fling

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courtesy of Karen Dillon

By: Lauren Murphy

On Saturday, May 13th, Student Council partnered with Arlington Youth Health and Safety Coalition to organize the first ever “Spring Fling”, an event for AHS students to relax and de-stress.

The event, held behind the Robbins Library, was free. It had many activities including yoga, painting, sidewalk chalk, and performances from live acoustic musicians. There were also free burritos donated by La Victoria and Anna’s Taqueria.

The main goal of this event was to build community for AHS students. Isa Dray, a sophomore, helped organize the event. It was important to her because Student Council was trying to create more “give back” events, “events [where we’re] not asking anything from the students. We just want them to come and have a good time,” Dray says.

Katherine Barker, a senior, chaired the event with Dray. For her, the goal of this event was “to be more inclusive and find ways to celebrate the diverse interests of the student body”.

Freshman Ella Simring attended the event and enjoyed it immensely. Her favorite activities were the sidewalk chalk and the “enlightening” bubbles. Simring felt very comfortable at this event. She said, “There was a nice, chill vibe around in general, and you didn’t have to put on any sort of façade or pretend to be someone else there; it felt very safe and welcoming”.

With the support of Karen Dillon from Arlington Youth Health and Safety Coalition, as well as AHS Social Workers Magali Olander and Chelsea White, the event ran smoothly. Barker is interested in continuing this event in the years to come.
Simring and her friends are looking forward to coming back and would “even be willing to help out with setting up”.

Arlington High School alumni reunite after 60 years

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Nancy Price
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Arlington High Alumni
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Arlington High Alumni

By: Isabella Scopetski

The Arlington High School classes of 1951, 1954, 1960, and 1967 recently had a reunion in the Villages in Florida of about 40-50 Arlington High alumni. The reunion was organized by Ms. Nancy Price, who was a proud member of the class of 1954 at Arlington High School. “I thought I was going to be the oldest,” she said.

Price grew up in Arlington and went to the Junior High West for middle school and the Locke School for primary education. She lived on Paul Revere Road and Newland Road during her childhood and took the trolley to the Arlington High School because there was no other public transportation.

During Price’s high school years, Raymond Morrill was principal. Teachers included: Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Dow, Mr. Charles Downs, Mrs. Forsyth, George Fusco, Mrs. Kelly, Mr. Kroll, Mrs. Manning, Mrs. Mathews, Mr. Petratrala, Ann Willard, Mr. Toner, and Mary Thompson. Price said she had “Frank Kotchin [for drivers ed]… and the yearbook was dedicated to Doc McCarthy [the track coach]”.

Many people who live in Arlington have lived here for generations.  Nancy Price said, “My mother and aunt graduated from Arlington High in 1930 and 1932.” After Price was born in the Walnut Street hospital, which she believes was just a house, her family built their life in Arlington Massachusetts. Price said, “My father owned a taxi cab business in Arlington Center by the drug store, and my Mother worked at the Regent Theater.”

During her junior year at AHS, Price was a “drum majorette” in the school marching band. She was the female leader of the band who lead the group with her twirling baton.

Price recalled, “Polio was bad in the 1950s and one of our friends came down with Polio.” She described him as an “iron lung”. Price could only visit her ill family friend if she “wore a long gown and didn’t stay too long”. The family friend recovered for a short time until the Polio returned, causing the friend to take his life.

Like many high schoolers, Price endured the troubles of her teenage years, while proudly attending and thriving at her high school. Price encourages the students at Arlington High School today to “enjoy your school; it is one of the best”. She adds, “Have fun, work hard, and go to college!”
“We cheer today the red and gray. We know our boys will shine,” says Price, recalling what once was the Arlington High school cheer.